Wednesday, August 23, 2017

FASHION SHOW CASTINGS' UNOFFICIAL DRESS CODE







At some point in its 22-year history, the Victoria's Secret Fashion Showbecame the be-all, end-all gig for bright-eyed models everywhere. With just 50-odd spots (many of which are reserved for contracted Angels), the casting process is notoriously competitive, to the extent that Gigi Hadid — whose genetic makeup basically established her to be a shoe-in — had to audition twice before finally making the cut in 2015. Alas, VSFS hopefuls still show up to the lingerie giant's New York City headquarters year after year with their books in hand, aspiring to at least score a spot in the runway show's more covered-up, cutesy Pink section. 
VSFS castings for the 2017 extravaganza kicked off late last week, significantly earlier than in years past, and photographers have been quick to document the gaggles of long-legged humans flocking to Ed Razek & Co in droves. In analyzing the shots, we noticed some undeniable outfit similarities among models — an unofficial dress code, if you will. Let's review it below, shall we?

1. HEAD-TO-TOE BLACK.


It's the color of New York. It's also the color of "cool." Don't mess this up.

2. ABS.


If you don't wear a cropped shirt, how will the casting directors know you even have abs? 

3. A DESIGNER HANDBAG.


No regular purse will do in this competitive scenario. 

4. A BLOWOUT.


The actual runway show will likely provide hair extensions and Beachwavers aplenty, but for the casting process, you're on your own.

5. YOUR BOOK, BUT YOU HAVE TO CARRY IT IN YOUR HANDS.


Do not put it in your bag where no one on the street can see it — are you kidding me? 

6. THE ABS THING AGAIN.


7. MORE ABS.


8. YOU DIDN'T PAY YOUR DOGPOUND TRAINER FOR NOTHING.


9. IF YOU'RE A FIRST-TIMER, A BUDDY.


Surely your agency can set up a playdate. Moral support is crucial in situations like these.


10. MILE-LONG LEGS.


Wear heels to make sure everyone knows how long they really are.

11. AND FINALLY, INSTAGRAM FOLLOWERS.


We all know how the game is played by now. Get those numbers up as fast as you can, ladies.
Good luck to all of the models auditioning this year. May the Angels smile upon you.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

tHE fLIPADOS tEAM @ Ermesindeboas

Adiciona||| boas boas mesmo boas |||r legenda

National Gallery artwork is not insured

The Telegraph
 
 

National Gallery artwork is not insured and 'really vulnerable', chairman admits 

Visitors view the British artist Chris Ofili's tapestry 'The Caged Bird's Song' at the 'Weaving Magic' exhibition at the National Gallery in April CREDIT: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Works of art in the National Gallery are “really vulnerable”, the institution’s chairman has admitted, as she said members of the public are their “greatest defenders”.
Hannah Rothschild disclosed none of the works at the gallery are insured because they are worth so much that no institution could afford the premiums.
Instead, she said, room attendants are “extremely highly trained” in protecting the works, including on “how to intercept lunatics”.
The fact is that the paintings at the National Gallery are not insured. Because we couldn’t possibly afford to insure themHannah Rothschild
Rothschild, an author and philanthropist, said the public had twice protected the art work from vandals in recent times, saying the necessary lack of insurance was “shocking but true”.
Sir Nicholas Serota, former head of the Tate galleries, said it too did not insure works hanging on its own walls, saying there was “every confidence” in the measures in place to protect them.
Asked how much the paintings hanging in the National Gallery were worth by Sir David Tang, during a talk at the China Exchange, Rothschild replied: “I wouldn’t have a clue.
“Incidentally, this isn’t something that we widely publish, but the fact is that the paintings at the National Gallery are not insured.
“Because we couldn’t possibly afford to insure them. They are priceless. How could you possibly insure even just The Ambassadors?”
She added of art galleries in general: “Nothing is insured in this country. You couldn't possibly afford to insure them. The moment they go off-site on tour then they become insured.
“They're too valuable, they’re priceless. Shocking but true.”
Room attendants are “extremely highly trained” in protecting the works, including on “how to intercept lunatics”
Room attendants are “extremely highly trained” in protecting the works, including on “how to intercept lunatics” CREDIT: UNIVERSALIMAGESGROUP
On the question of what would happen if someone attempted to damage a painting, or there was a fire, she conceded: “Yeah, you're in trouble.
“The room attendants are extremely highly trained in all sorts of things including how to intercept lunatics. And there are CCTV cameras and everything else.
“But yeah, it's really vulnerable.”
“Very recently, somebody did have a go at a picture and I think what happened was the attendant went and launched themselves at them and so did members of the public.
“I think it was an instinctive reaction. You wouldn’t say to somebody, put yourself in danger. But actually instinctively what happens is that the room wardens get so protective over paintings, and the members of public love them so much, that they don’t want members of the public attacking them.
“The public sometimes are the greatest defenders of the work of art. It’s happened twice now it's been the public which has protected a work of art.
Rothschild, an author and philanthropist, said the public had twice protected the art work from vandals in recent times
Rothschild, an author and philanthropist, said the public had twice protected the art work from vandals in recent times CREDIT: VIEW PICTURES/UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES
Speaking to Sir David during a later public talk, Sir Nicholas Serota was asked the same question.
"The only things that are insured at the Tate are the works that are being lent to us,” he said.
"We're not allowed to insure because the cost to the Exchequer would be huge. And I think there's every confidence in our security.”
He added: “Which is not to say that nothing has ever disappeared from the Tate and not to say nothing has never been introduced to the Tate.”
A spokesman for the National Gallery said: "The National Gallery takes every precaution to ensure the safety of its Collection, its visitors and staff.
"However, we never discuss our security measures in detail as to do so could compromise our security.
"The Gallery’s collection, when it is displayed on site, is not commercially insured consistent with the principle that Government property (including the whole of the British National Collection) is self-insured.
"When we lend works we require borrowers to insure the works to their full value. Also, when the Gallery borrows from third parties the works we borrow are insured under the UK Government Indemnity scheme."